Wildland Firefighter Foundation
Wildland Firefighter Foundation
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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4
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    Default Re: Fireline EMT/Medic Packs

    CeeBee,

    For the past few years I have been working on a similar project for a large fire agency in California( since the Firescope line paramedic guidelines went draft.) The question you posed on which type of pack was one of the most difficult problems we had to overcome. In a nutshell, what we found was a separate backpack with sewn in FSS buckles provided the most flexibility.

    The amount of equipment is clearly defined in the FEMP document. The main constraint with this is weight. If you are assigned to the "Line" you need to be prepared to hike and as such you need to have a pack or set-up that will allow this. Aside from you personal gear or personal pack we used 30 lbs as an absolute maximum for the medical pack.

    We did not have success in fitting the "required" Firescope complement into any of the currently available commercial fireline packs, especially if you consider you need to have the necessities in that pack to support a 12 or 24 hour shift.

    When you combine the issue of everyone having a different types of fire packs, everyone not wanting to switch into an "issued" pack, the high cost of issueing everyone the same pack, what you come up with is picking a good specialty medical pack that everyone can use and wear in addition to your fire pack.

    Our FEMP kits includes a BLS bag, an ALS bag, and restock.

    Hope that helps...........



    AJ- I met with RF and BO the other day and discussed some of these issue and they said you might want to get together and see what we have done...let me know

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    SO CAL
    Posts
    50
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    Default Re: Fireline EMT/Medic Packs

    Hello..

    Take a look at what Mystery Ranch has, we are looking at the EMS Pack they make mostly because it can carry everything we need. For the AED's make sure you get one that can take the shock and abuse of a wildland firefighter. Phillips makes a great AED cost a little more but worth the extra for what it has to offer.


    Stay Safe!
    Last edited by Mod-Green; 05-28-2010 at 19:59. Reason: Removed links.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    10
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    Default Re: Fireline EMT/Medic Packs

    Most of my single resource assignments I get are for Line EMT, and over the past 7 years I had a full range of assignments from basic blisters to multiple fatality. It is hard to prepare for this assignments because you don't know if you are going to be vehicle based or hiking the line with the crews, so I have vehicle based equipment, and then there is line gear.

    When it comes to being out on the line with handcrews I carry what I can, but I can't carry everything. When I am out with the shot crews I limit my EMS bags and equipment to 12lbs, and take the wilderness perspective and carry just the essentials.

    I use a Mystery Ranch handcrew pack (love it!), it is able to carry everything I need to be from the fire side of things; and for EMS equipment I have two Conterra ski patrol style EMS bags that get clip onto the outside.

    Many of the manufactured Fire Line EMT packs are the result of a company designing something real quick to try fill a void in the market, but fall way short. A good line pack has to have a designed to carry a heavy load and be comfortable. Many of theses backpacks address carrying medical equipment and leave no room left to carry your fire stuff: shelter, 1-2 brownbag lunches, water+gatorade, sweatshirt, misc. coyote line camping stuff, gps, BK radio. When said and done your pack is about 50lbs. If anyone has any questions feel free to PM me.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    38
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    Default Re: Fireline EMT/Medic Packs

    Our department is using two Nim-Rod packs. One with ALS gear, and the other with BLS. Our department insists on pairing our medics with an EMT. We only deploy as a pair. This is for safety, increased medical capability, and balance of gear considerations. This is in-line with FIRESCOPE's recommendations. The Nim-Rod packs are scaleable-with detachable modules, that allow you to adapt to the various scenarios an FEMT/P team can face. The safety/web gear is integrated into the pack. All the medical stuff can be quickly tossed from the web gear if you have to go into FF attack/survival mode. Same principle as military medics. We use Zoll's AED-Pro which is light and has a screen and 3-Lead EKG capability. We use the KTD KED traction splint which only weighs a few onces. In the past, I used alpine technical back country ski packs over my web gear which also worked well-although difficult to organize/segregate gear. We were able to hump this gear right along side Hot Shot crews on long hikes.

    This duty is not for the ill-equipped or out of shape. You need to be able to keep up, and get there quick when they call. Make sure you put alot of thought into your rig and foot wear.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Rancho Cucamonga
    Posts
    122
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    Default Fireline EMT

    Im new to the Fireline EMT and I wanted to get a list of gear that a seasoned line EMT has in his pack and what kind of pack you're using? I dont want to take the ER out on the line but I just want to know what is reasonable. Any input is helpful thank you.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Graeagle, California
    Posts
    42
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    Default Re: Fireline EMT/Medic Packs

    Our medics use the "medic pack" from TrueNorth. It holds everything we need just fine. Another good pack is made by conterra. It is not a "fireline" pack, but it is a good pack. You just have to add a fire shelter to it.

    It is difficult to carry everything FIRESCOPE is asking us to carry. Be creative on how you put your package together. ALS- Epi does need to be packaged in a bulky pre-load. Use a vial. This holds true to any of your ALS medications. A Kendrick Traction Splint is a great femur splint. Carry 1 adjustable c-collar. Leave a board and/or litter in your vehicle. You get the idea. All of our "medications" fit into a 1 gallon ziplock bag (not even full).

    Oxygen is the biggest problem for hiking. There are very small cylinders on the market. You can "refill" them with a regular cylinder if need be. I doubt refilling them would meet OSHA standards, but it can be done.

    AEDs are simple nowdays. Just find the smallest you can.

    Our fireline packs are heavier than a "normal" fireline pack, but not that bad. Pick and choose what equipment you actually hike with and keep your vehicle well stocked.

    Hope this helps.

    dj

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